Center for Health Literacy Promotion - Action research for effective use of health info & services
RSS Follow Become a Fan

Recent Posts

Shanghai Declaration on Health Promotion: Strengthen Health Literacy
Update Health Literacy Research for the Third Era of Modern Healthcare
What does mothers' health literacy have to do with disparities?
Affordable Care Act Review by the Numbers
Short answer to Why promote parents’ health literacy?: DOHaD + SDoH = HL

Categories

Health Literacy
Maternal Child Health
Test
powered by

Center for Health Literacy Promotion Blog

2015 Kids Count Child Well-Being Report Released

Health disparities, low health literacy begin in poverty
Despite some encouraging news in the just-released annual state rankings for child well-being, Annie E Casey Foundation reports large numbers of children of all racial and ethnic groups are facing economic conditions that can impede long-term success.  In 2013 (latest figures) in the world's richest country, 22% of all children live below the poverty line —$24,250 annual income for a family of 4. According to the Economic Policy Institute it takes at least twice that amount to provide basic essentials. It's worse than the average suggests.  Here is where health disparities begin: 39% of African American children,  37% of Native American children, 33% of Hispanic children live in poverty. Compared to 14% of white children.

      "When very young children experience poverty, particularly if that poverty is         deep and persistent, they are at high risk of encountering difficulties later in      life - having poorer adolescent health, becoming teen mothers, dropping out        of school and facing poor employment outcomes." 

Implications for health literacy improvement                                            
These figures jumped out at me since preliminary findings from my current research suggest that basic essentials —- safe housing, adequate food, transportation, health insurance, and child care — are prerequisites for developing maternal health literacy, mothers' ability to use information and services to keep healthy and raise and healthy competent child. It makes sense that no amount of reading skill, understanding of healthcare, or knowledge of preventive practices can make those practices possible when feeding the children necessarily takes priority. National and international policy documents call for improving health literacy in parents to reduce health disparities. Progress in unlikely until we provide health insurance and economic supports to parents of very young children. 
 
Cheers for the Affordable Care Act
Thanks to Obamacare, the rate of insured kids improved 30% leaving 7% or 5.2 million uninsured, most in states that declined to expand Medicaid
 
Cheers for Alaska
Applause for Alaska governor Bill Walker. He announced last week that he will use executive authority to expand Medicaid. That means nearly 30,000 Alaskans will soon be able obtain insurance.  The annual Kids Count Datebook ranks Alaska 31 among the states for child health. The governor's action bodes well for a higher ranking in coming years.
 
Cheers for Minnesota
They're Number 1 overall in the Kids Count ratings, 2nd in health behind Iowa.
 
Oh Mississippi! Worst place for kids. Still.  
Mississippi ranked 50th overall as it has every year since the rankings were first published in 1990. The state was last in economic well-being, health, and family & community. It ranked 48th in education ahead of New Mexico and Nevada.
 
 
See your state rankings here.
 
 
References:
Economic Policy Institute. Family budget calculator. www.epi.org/resources/budget/  



Website Builder provided by  Vistaprint